Aug 142017
 
Dramatic landslide headscarp threatens this structure on Constellation Drive in Skyway, Colorado Springs, Colorado, May 2017. Photo credit: Jon Lovekin, PG.

Dramatic landslide headscarp threatens this structure on Constellation Drive in Skyway, Colorado Springs, Colorado, May 2017. Photo credit: Jon Lovekin, PG.

The city of Colorado Springs lies at the boundary between the Great Plains and the Front Range of the southern Rocky Mountains. Western sections of the city are underlain by weak claystones and shales that are prone to landslides. Several developed areas have experienced various degrees of damage from landslide movements during the 1990s and over the last several years. These landslides were widely reported in the press; however, it is apparent that significant segments of the general public are not aware that they reside in areas with landslide hazards. The purpose of this symposium is to help educate the public about the inherent risks, liabilities, and responsibilities of both living in and developing such terrain.

WHAT

A free public symposium featuring a panel of experts will include informative presentations on landslide hazard risk, disclosure requirements for sellers and agents, construction requirements under the city’s revised geologic hazard ordinance, home warranties, and more.

Held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Association of Environmental and Engineering Geologists, there is no cost or preregistration requirement but seating is limited. If you wish to attend other AEG events you will need to preregister and pay a registration fee.

WHERE

Carson Room, Antlers Hotel, Downtown Colorado Springs, Colorado

WHEN

September 15, 2017, 9:00 AM – 12:00 NOON

SCHEDULE

8:45 am — Doors Open (seating is first-come-first-serve!)

9:00 am — Opening Remarks, Mayor John Suthers, City of Colorado Springs

9:20 am — Jon White, Senior Geologist, Colorado Geological Survey: Landslide Susceptibility in the Colorado Springs Area — Geology and History

10:00 am — Marcia Waters, Director of the Division of Real Estate, Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies: Real Estate Disclosure Requirements

10:20 am — Robert Moore, Risk Management Engineer: 2-10 Home Buyers Warranty, Requirements for Colorado Springs Landslide Susceptibility Zone

10:40 am — Don Knight and Tom Strand, Council members, City of Colorado Springs: Public Policy and Landslides, Revising the City’s Geologic Hazard Ordinance

11:20 am — Peter Wysocki, City of Colorado Springs Planning Director: New Requirements for Developing in Geologic Hazard Areas

11:40 — Panel Discussion

May 162017
 

The Association of American State Geologists announced that their annual John C. Frye Memorial Award for 2017 is granted to the CGS and the staff members who authored the report The West Salt Creek Landslide: A Catastrophic Rockslide and Rock/Debris Avalanche in Mesa County, Colorado (CGS Bulletin-55). Utilizing a rich field data set, the report includes a comprehensive review of the geologic history of the area and presents a detailed timeline of the events surrounding the “the longest landslide in Colorado’s historical record.”

White, Jonathan L., Matthew L. Morgan, and Karen A. Berry. “Bulletin 55 - The West Salt Creek Landslide: A Catastrophic Rockslide and Rock/Debris Avalanche in Mesa County.” Bulletins. Golden, CO: Colorado Geological Survey, 2015. Bulletin 55.

White, Jonathan L., Matthew L. Morgan, and Karen A. Berry. “Bulletin 55 – The West Salt Creek Landslide: A Catastrophic Rockslide and Rock/Debris Avalanche in Mesa County.” Bulletins. Golden, CO: Colorado Geological Survey, 2015. Bulletin 55.

History of the Award:

Environmental geology has steadily risen in prominence over recent decades, and to support the growth of this important field, the Frye Award was established in 1989 by GSA and AASG. It recognizes work on environmental geology issues such as water resources, engineering geology, and hazards.

John C. Frye joined the US Geological Survey in 1938, he went to the Kansas Geological Survey in 1942, he was its Director from 1945 to 1954, he was Chief of the Illinois State Geological Survey until 1974, and was Geological Society of America Executive Director until his retirement in 1982, shortly before his death. John was active in Association of American State Geologists and on national committees, and was influential in the growth of environmental geology.

The Award is given each year to a nominated environmental geology publication published in the current year or one of the three preceding calendar years either by GSA or by a state geological survey. A shared $1000 prize and a certificate to each author is presented at the AASG Mid-Year meeting, held Tuesday morning at the GSA annual meeting.


Citation: White, Jonathan L., Matthew L. Morgan, and Karen A. Berry. Bulletin 55 – The West Salt Creek Landslide: A Catastrophic Rockslide and Rock/Debris Avalanche in Mesa County. Bulletins. Golden, CO: Colorado Geological Survey, 2015. Bulletin 55.