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Bohemian karst (Český kras) landscape formed in a limestone of Silurian and mainly Devonian age. The area hosts several international stratotype and parastratotype sections, including the main Silurian/Devonian Global Boundary Stratotype Section at Suchomasty. Photo credit: Milos Sejn.

Dr. Cílek on the Bohemian karst

2005-03-04 | Dr. John Hopkins

Dr. Cílek, the Director of the Czech Republic’s Academy of Sciences Institute of Geology delivers a fascinating talk about the Bohemian Karst region of the Czech Republic, around Beroun, that weaves the human historical, mystical, and mythological elements with the underlying geology and speleology.

(00:36:32, stereo audio, 70.1 mb)
Bohemian karst (Český kras) landscape formed in a limestone of Silurian and mainly Devonian age. The area hosts several international stratotype and parastratotype sections, including the main Silurian/Devonian Global Boundary Stratotype Section at Suchomasty. Photo credit: Milos Sejn.
Bohemian karst (Český kras) landscape formed in a limestone of Silurian and mainly Devonian age. The area hosts several international stratotype and parastratotype sections, including the main Silurian/Devonian Global Boundary Stratotype Section at Suchomasty. Photo credit: Milos Sejn.

Most people don’t know that Colorado has a small but significant areas that are underlain by Mesozoic and/or Paleozoic evaporite deposits.

From a geologic hazard standpoint, the most important characteristic of evaporite bedrock is that they dissolve in the presence of fresh water. The dissolution of evaporite rock alters ground and surface water flows, and creates subsurface voids such as caverns, open fissures, and solution pipes. Collapse of these subsurface voids manifests itself at the surface as subsidence — a geologic hazard and risk for overlying structures. Ground and surface water can be captured by the subsurface voids to create closed topographic basins and disappearing streams, subterranean rivers, and re-emergent springs. These landforms are described collectively as karst morphology.

Citations, Categories & Tags

Citations

White, Jonathan L. “OF-12-02 Colorado Map of Potential Evaporite Dissolution and Evaporite Karst Subsidence Hazards.” Evaporite and Karst. Open File Reports. Golden, CO: Colorado Geological Survey, 2012.

White, Jonathan L. “MS-34 Collapsible Soils and Evaporite Karst Hazards Map of the Roaring Fork River Corridor, Garfield, Eagle, and Pitkin Counties, Colorado.” Soil and Karst Hazards. Map Series MS-34. Denver, CO: Colorado Geological Survey, Department of Natural Resources, 2002.

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audio, geology, images, int'l, karst