Nov 152017
 
Water Resources Investigation WRI 2017-1a, The Upper Pierre Aquifer of the Cheyenne Basin, Northeastern Colorado, Geologic Cross Sections

Our friends over at the Colorado Division of Water Resources (CDWR) have just released Water Resources Investigation WRI 2017-1a, The Upper Pierre Aquifer of the Cheyenne Basin, Northeastern Colorado, Geologic Cross Sections, authored by Ralf Topper, Clinton D. Meyer, Marshall Haworth, Kevin C. Donegan, Hillary Banks, Aaron Bandler, Andrew Flor, and Matthew A. Sares.

Summary:

This report is a compilation of ten regional geologic cross sections created from interpretation of geophysical logs from 200 oil and gas wells. It is the first of a two-part hydrogeologic study of the Upper Pierre aquifer within the Cheyenne Basin of northeastern Colorado and consists of a short text report along with 11 plates. The cross sections depict the following geologic/hydrogeologic intervals: South Platte River alluvial aquifer, Ogallala Formation, White River Formation, Laramie Formation, Fox Hills Sandstone, Upper Pierre Shale upper confining layer, Upper Pierre aquifer, Pierre Ash, and the Upper Pierre Shale lower confining layer.

The text, maps, and cross sections may be downloaded from the DWR Homepage in the “New!” section in the middle of the page.

Contact Matthew A. Sares, Manager, Hydrogeological Services with any questions.

Oct 302017
 

Colorado has many areas susceptible to the problems that swelling soils cause. This video gives some background on the problem.

Feb 282017
 

No Geologist worth anything is permanently bound to a desk or laboratory, but the charming notion that true science can only be based on unbiased observation of nature in the raw is mythology. Creative work, in geology and anywhere else, is interaction and synthesis: half-baked ideas from a bar room, rocks in the field, chains of thought from lonely walks, numbers squeezed from rocks in a laboratory, numbers from a calculator riveted to a desk, fancy equipment usually malfunctioning on expensive ships, cheap equipment in the human cranium, arguments before a road cut.

— Stephen Gould

Any other ideas as to where/how creative geologic ideas arrive? Any personal mythologies out there?

Feb 242017
 

One of the many fascinating videos from our geo-friends up the road at University of Colorado-Boulder.

The Interactive Geology Project was formed in 2002 by professor Paul Weimer and colleagues with the goal of producing short 3D animations about the geologic evolution of key US national parks. The first major project focused on the geology of the Colorado National Monument and is still on display in the park’s visitor center. Over time our focus shifted from national parks to animating Colorado’s geologic history, with a key goal of developing a series of 5-10 minute vignettes covering each geologic time period.

The current group of animators joined the project in the summer of 2011. In 2013 we began a major collaboration with the Denver Museum of Nature and Science to explore new ways of using 3D technology in earth science education. We work with top subject-area experts to ensure our animations are as scientifically accurate and up-to-date as possible.

Our projects are on display in museums, parks, and other venues across Colorado, the Western US, and Canada. All of our work is also available to the general public free of charge on our website and our Vimeo page.

Feb 102017
 

Jan 242017
 

Apr 222016
 

Deltares hosted 15 international subsidence experts to discuss subsidence problems worldwide at the annual meeting of UNESCO Land Subsidence working group. Gilles Erkens, subsidence expert Deltares showed the impact of subsidence in the Netherlands during a field trip:

Land subsidence is causing more and more damage every year. It scarcely registers on the radar of many countries. Even so, the impact on coastal cities and peat areas is increasingly apparent. Levels of flood damage are rising and the risk of casualties is following. Land subsidence can also lead to major economic losses such as structural damage and high maintenance costs for roads, railways, dikes, pipelines and buildings. The total bill worldwide mounts up to many billions of dollars annually. It can only rise further in the future with population growth and the intensification of economic activities in delta areas.