Sep 122017
 

Members of our geoscience staff are busy this week participating in the Annual Meeting of the Association of Environmental & Engineering Geologists taking place in Colorado Springs this year. CGS Director and State Geologist, Karen Berry, PG, is the Technical Session Moderator, the organizer of Technical Session #18, and is hosting the annual Women in AEG/AWG Breakfast; Kevin McCoy, PhD, is a Symposium Convener and presenter; Jon Lovekin, PG, is leading the field-trip Fire, Flood, and Landslide Impacts and Mitigation around the area; CGS Deputy Director, Matthew L. Morgan presents Change Detection of the West Salt Creek Landslide, Colorado Using Multi-Temporal Lidar and UAVSAR Datasets; and Senior Engineering Geologist (Emeritus), Jon White, speaks on Landslide Susceptibility in the Colorado Springs Area — Geology and History at Technical Session #18: Landslide Hazard Info for Colorado Springs Residents and Real Estate Professionals which is a special program that is free and open to the public.

[See the AEG Annual Meeting Program/Abstracts catalog for further information.]

Kevin’s presentation, in particular, From Outcrop to Web: CGS Integrates Digital Data and GIS Technologies to Map Geology, Hazards, and Groundwater Resources, introduces some of the ground-breaking (pardon the pun!) work that we do on behalf of the citizens of the state of Colorado:

Abstract: The Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) employs an array of digital data and GIS technologies for mapping geology, natural hazards, and groundwater resources, and disseminating the resulting data to the public. Key technologies include iPads with GIS software for data collection and field verification of GIS models, a growing lidar data set for the state, digital aerial stereo imagery, GIS-based models for natural hazard analysis, GIS tools for mapping and analyzing groundwater resources, and web-based platforms for disseminating digital maps and data to the public. This talk will provide an overview of these technologies, a summary of current lidar data acquisition and statewide goals, and a summary of goals for integrating newly-emerging technologies in future projects. Two detailed case studies illustrating use of the technologies will be provided. In the County-Wide Debris Flow Susceptibility Mapping Program, CGS is mapping areas susceptible to debris flows and/or mudflows on a countywide basis for 43 counties in 13 Priority Areas comprising the mountainous portions of the state. Maps are prepared using GIS-based debris-flow source area and runout models, visual interpretation of high-resolution digital terrain data, and digitized geologic and soil survey data. In the County Geology and Groundwater Resources Program, geologists create three-dimensional layered models of geologic formations on a countywide basis in a GIS environment. This process integrates data from multiple sources starting with surface geologic maps and incorporating other datasets such as subsurface depth information, well distribution data, and water quality data. The compilation is presented in a format that allows users to visualize the spatial distribution of groundwater resources.

And his full PowerPoint:

Aug 142017
 
Dramatic landslide headscarp threatens this structure on Constellation Drive in Skyway, Colorado Springs, Colorado, May 2017. Photo credit: Jon Lovekin, PG.

Dramatic landslide headscarp threatens this structure on Constellation Drive in Skyway, Colorado Springs, Colorado, May 2017. Photo credit: Jon Lovekin, PG.

The city of Colorado Springs lies at the boundary between the Great Plains and the Front Range of the southern Rocky Mountains. Western sections of the city are underlain by weak claystones and shales that are prone to landslides. Several developed areas have experienced various degrees of damage from landslide movements during the 1990s and over the last several years. These landslides were widely reported in the press; however, it is apparent that significant segments of the general public are not aware that they reside in areas with landslide hazards. The purpose of this symposium is to help educate the public about the inherent risks, liabilities, and responsibilities of both living in and developing such terrain.

WHAT

A free public symposium featuring a panel of experts will include informative presentations on landslide hazard risk, disclosure requirements for sellers and agents, construction requirements under the city’s revised geologic hazard ordinance, home warranties, and more. Continue reading »

Jul 092017
 

Earthquakes strike suddenly, violently, and without warning. While Colorado is not as seismically active as some places, it does have a history of earthquake activity. Identifying potential hazards ahead of time and advance planning can reduce the dangers of serious injury or loss of life from an earthquake. Repairing deep plaster cracks in ceilings and foundations, anchoring overhead lighting fixtures to the ceiling, and following local seismic building standards, will help reduce the impact of earthquakes.

Six Ways to Plan Ahead

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