Sep 122017
 

Members of our geoscience staff are busy this week participating in the Annual Meeting of the Association of Environmental & Engineering Geologists taking place in Colorado Springs this year. CGS Director and State Geologist, Karen Berry, PG, is the Technical Session Moderator, the organizer of Technical Session #18, and is hosting the annual Women in AEG/AWG Breakfast; Kevin McCoy, PhD, is a Symposium Convener and presenter; Jon Lovekin, PG, is leading the field-trip Fire, Flood, and Landslide Impacts and Mitigation around the area; CGS Deputy Director, Matthew L. Morgan presents Change Detection of the West Salt Creek Landslide, Colorado Using Multi-Temporal Lidar and UAVSAR Datasets; and Senior Engineering Geologist (Emeritus), Jon White, speaks on Landslide Susceptibility in the Colorado Springs Area — Geology and History at Technical Session #18: Landslide Hazard Info for Colorado Springs Residents and Real Estate Professionals which is a special program that is free and open to the public.

[See the AEG Annual Meeting Program/Abstracts catalog for further information.]

Kevin’s presentation, in particular, From Outcrop to Web: CGS Integrates Digital Data and GIS Technologies to Map Geology, Hazards, and Groundwater Resources, introduces some of the ground-breaking (pardon the pun!) work that we do on behalf of the citizens of the state of Colorado:

Abstract: The Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) employs an array of digital data and GIS technologies for mapping geology, natural hazards, and groundwater resources, and disseminating the resulting data to the public. Key technologies include iPads with GIS software for data collection and field verification of GIS models, a growing lidar data set for the state, digital aerial stereo imagery, GIS-based models for natural hazard analysis, GIS tools for mapping and analyzing groundwater resources, and web-based platforms for disseminating digital maps and data to the public. This talk will provide an overview of these technologies, a summary of current lidar data acquisition and statewide goals, and a summary of goals for integrating newly-emerging technologies in future projects. Two detailed case studies illustrating use of the technologies will be provided. In the County-Wide Debris Flow Susceptibility Mapping Program, CGS is mapping areas susceptible to debris flows and/or mudflows on a countywide basis for 43 counties in 13 Priority Areas comprising the mountainous portions of the state. Maps are prepared using GIS-based debris-flow source area and runout models, visual interpretation of high-resolution digital terrain data, and digitized geologic and soil survey data. In the County Geology and Groundwater Resources Program, geologists create three-dimensional layered models of geologic formations on a countywide basis in a GIS environment. This process integrates data from multiple sources starting with surface geologic maps and incorporating other datasets such as subsurface depth information, well distribution data, and water quality data. The compilation is presented in a format that allows users to visualize the spatial distribution of groundwater resources.

And his full PowerPoint:

Jul 032017
 

Nearly 100 potentially hazardous faults have been identified in Colorado. Generally, these are faults thought to have had movement within about the past 2 million years. There are other faults in the state that may have potential for producing future earthquakes. Because the occurrence of earthquakes is relatively infrequent in Colorado and the historical earthquake record is relatively short (only about 130 years), it is not possible to accurately estimate the timing or location of future dangerous earthquakes in Colorado. Nevertheless, the available seismic hazard information can provide a basis for a reasoned and prudent approach to seismic safety.

Faulting

Sudden movement on long faults is responsible for large earthquakes. By studying the geologic characteristics of faults, geoscientists can often determine when the fault last moved and estimate the magnitude of the earthquake that produced the last movement. In some cases it is possible to evaluate how frequently large earthquakes occurred on a specific fault during the recent geological past. Continue reading »

Jun 272017
 
OF-16-02 Geologic Map of the Watkins Quadrangle, Arapahoe and Adams Counties, Colorado

We’ve just uploaded the next of our free STATEMAP quadrangle map products to our online store: the Geologic Map of the Watkins Quadrangle, Arapahoe and Adams Counties, Colorado. The STATEMAP series in general provides a detailed description of the geology, mineral and ground-water resource potential, and the geologic hazards of an area. This free release from the CGS includes two plates (with a geologic map, cross-section with correlation, oblique 3D view, legend, and description) along with the corresponding GIS data package that allows for digital viewing, all in a single zip file..

Location of the Watkins Quadrangle, Arapahoe and Adams Counties, Colorado.

Location of the Watkins Quadrangle, Arapahoe and Adams Counties, Colorado.

Matt Morgan, Senior Research Geologist and CGS Deputy Director, along with Senior Engineering Geologist (Emeritus) Jon White generated this map with special input from Richard Madole (surficial geology) and Shannon Mahan (OSL analysis), both of the USGS. This free release from the CGS includes two PDF plates (with a geologic map, cross-section with correlation, oblique 3D view, and legend) along with the corresponding GIS data package that allows for digital viewing, all in a single ZIP file. Continue reading »