May 132017
 

We’ve decided to revive one of our most popular print publications — RockTalk — as a blog so that we can continue to bring you interesting, informative, and timely postings related to our mission. This year, 2017, will see 110 years since the founding of the CGS.

The first RockTalk appeared in 1998 and was followed by forty seasonal issues until the most recent one in 2011. We constantly get requests for back issues and to continue publishing, so in accordance with the times, we decided to make the shift to digital media. We hope you will join us by subscribing (to receive an email when we make a new posting, please enter your email in the subscription box in the right-hand column).

Content-wise, we’ll be exploring all of the many aspects of our State Survey mission to:

  • Help reduce the impact of geologic hazards on the citizens of Colorado
  • Promote responsible economic development of mineral and energy resources
  • Provide geologic insight into water resources
  • Provide geologic advice and information to a variety of constituencies

And, along the way, we’ll also post pertinent information on general geology, geoscience research and education, science and engineering policy, and other items that cross our screens. If you have any questions or suggestions, please get in touch!

Mar 142017
 

We just found out about this year’s Cumbres & Toltec Geology Train adventure in southwest Colorado/northwest New Mexico — 18 June 2017. It’s a special opportunity to enjoy some of that Rio Grande Rift, Brazos Uplift, Tusas Mountains, San Luis Basin, and San Juan Sag scenery.

Our very own Peter Barkmann, geologist extraordinaire and veteran Geology Train guide, will be on board for an informative and energized day in the high country.

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On June 18th, a special train will depart to traverse spectacular geology along the 64 miles of Cumbres & Toltec track. But simply experiencing the incredible overviews of the Rio Grande Rift, the eruptive evidence of the San Juan Volcanic field, the Precambrian core of the Tusas Mountains, recent glacial deposits, and snapshots of the Jurassic, will not be enough. This special train will stop at many outcrops and rail cuts along the right of way, to mingle, marvel and collect photographs, samples and experiences only accessible on the train route.

ALL ABOARD!

Feb 242017
 

One of the many fascinating videos from our geo-friends up the road at University of Colorado-Boulder.

The Interactive Geology Project was formed in 2002 by professor Paul Weimer and colleagues with the goal of producing short 3D animations about the geologic evolution of key US national parks. The first major project focused on the geology of the Colorado National Monument and is still on display in the park’s visitor center. Over time our focus shifted from national parks to animating Colorado’s geologic history, with a key goal of developing a series of 5-10 minute vignettes covering each geologic time period.

The current group of animators joined the project in the summer of 2011. In 2013 we began a major collaboration with the Denver Museum of Nature and Science to explore new ways of using 3D technology in earth science education. We work with top subject-area experts to ensure our animations are as scientifically accurate and up-to-date as possible.

Our projects are on display in museums, parks, and other venues across Colorado, the Western US, and Canada. All of our work is also available to the general public free of charge on our website and our Vimeo page.

Feb 172017
 

The current annual Colorado Mineral and Energy Industry Activities report 2015-16 is now available. Following up on the 2014 report, this report, based on 2015 production data, sketches a comprehensive overview of Colorado’s mineral resource production. Of note is the fact that total value of mineral and energy fuels production in Colorado for 2015 is estimated to be $13.43 billion, a 29% decline from the $18.8 billion production value in 2014. The decline was caused primarily by a precipitous decrease in oil and gas market prices which provide 70% of Colorado mineral resource revenue. Oil and gas production actually registered at all-time highs of 127.6 Mbbl and 1,709 Bcf, respectively.

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Nonfuel mineral production — including metals, industrial minerals, and construction materials — posted a modest 3.9% increase in revenue. Increased production of crushed stone, cement, and sand and gravel aggregate accounted for the increase. With a 2015 production of 21,790 metric tons of molybdenum from two mines, Colorado is the largest molybdenum producer in the U.S. Although just one mine in the state publicly reported gold production in 2015, Colorado remains the third largest producer of the metal in the U.S. as it was in 2014.


Citation: Cappa, James A., Michael K. O’Keefe, James R. Guilinger, and Karen A. Berry. “IS-79 Colorado Mineral and Energy Industry Activities 2015-16.” Mineral and Energy Industry. Information Series. Golden, CO: Colorado Geological Survey, 2016.