Aug 142017
 
Dramatic landslide headscarp threatens this structure on Constellation Drive in Skyway, Colorado Springs, Colorado, May 2017. Photo credit: Jon Lovekin, PG.

Dramatic landslide headscarp threatens this structure on Constellation Drive in Skyway, Colorado Springs, Colorado, May 2017. Photo credit: Jon Lovekin, PG.

The city of Colorado Springs lies at the boundary between the Great Plains and the Front Range of the southern Rocky Mountains. Western sections of the city are underlain by weak claystones and shales that are prone to landslides. Several developed areas have experienced various degrees of damage from landslide movements during the 1990s and over the last several years. These landslides were widely reported in the press; however, it is apparent that significant segments of the general public are not aware that they reside in areas with landslide hazards. The purpose of this symposium is to help educate the public about the inherent risks, liabilities, and responsibilities of both living in and developing such terrain.

WHAT

A free public symposium featuring a panel of experts will include informative presentations on landslide hazard risk, disclosure requirements for sellers and agents, construction requirements under the city’s revised geologic hazard ordinance, home warranties, and more. Continue reading »

Mar 142017
 

We just found out about this year’s Cumbres & Toltec Geology Train adventure in southwest Colorado/northwest New Mexico — 18 June 2017. It’s a special opportunity to enjoy some of that Rio Grande Rift, Brazos Uplift, Tusas Mountains, San Luis Basin, and San Juan Sag scenery.

Our very own Peter Barkmann, geologist extraordinaire and veteran Geology Train guide, will be on board for an informative and energized day in the high country.

no images were found

On June 18th, a special train will depart to traverse spectacular geology along the 64 miles of Cumbres & Toltec track. But simply experiencing the incredible overviews of the Rio Grande Rift, the eruptive evidence of the San Juan Volcanic field, the Precambrian core of the Tusas Mountains, recent glacial deposits, and snapshots of the Jurassic, will not be enough. This special train will stop at many outcrops and rail cuts along the right of way, to mingle, marvel and collect photographs, samples and experiences only accessible on the train route.

ALL ABOARD!